Knitting The Slanted Or Diagonal Inset Pocket

Pocket lining in progress for slanted inset pocket

Pocket lining in progress for slanted inset pocket of right pant leg

Slanted inset pocket style showing inside cast on edge

Slanted inset pocket style showing inside cast on edge of pocket lining

Right side of slanted inset pocket showing even edge of cast on stitches

Right side of slanted inset pocket showing even edge of cast on stitches

Pockets are a detail that can enhance the most simple hand knit garment. Pocket types include the patch, horizontal inset, vertical inset, and slanted inset pockets. Inset pockets are very common, and the slanted pocket style is popular in pants, the topic of this post.

Firstly, if designing your own pocket, decide on the depth, width, and angle of the pocket. My pocket sample is knit in the right front pant leg. If you are following pattern instructions that incorporate a slanted inset pocket, you may want to try the way I cast on the lining stitches to alleviate some sewing.

The lining for inset pockets are usually knit first, but with the slanted inset the pocket is knit first. Work to where the pocket opening begins, and place the remaining stitches on a holder (to be worked later as the pocket lining). Work the slanted section, in this case the right front side, by decreasing at the pocket opening edge according to the pattern instructions or according to your design. When designing this style of pocket, plan the decreases to form an even slope. I also work my decreases 1 stitch in from the side edge, so the edge is not jagged. Knit the desired length of the pocket, then place these stitches on another holder.

For the pocket lining, pattern instructions typically ask you to cast on stitches with a second ball of yarn equal to the total number of stitches for the pocket width, then work across the stitches you placed on the first holder. Then knit pocket lining the same depth as the pocket. What I did differently was to pick up stitches (the purl bumps of stockinette stitch on the wrong side of the work) on the back side of pocket along the same row as the start of slant pocket; then work across the stitches from the first holder (slip these stitches to a needle first) for pocket lining. Note: It is a good idea to mark this row ahead of time with contrast yarn to make picking up stitches easier. Continue to work the same depth as the slant pocket, ending with a wrong side row. Rejoin both sections by working across all stitches and knitting together the inside pocket lining stitches with the pocket stitches (knitting 2 stitches together off of 2 needles to get back to the correct number of stitches for the waist). Picking up stitches instead of casting on eliminates having to sew the bottom of pocket lining to the wrong side. A border can be added if desired. Work the left pocket the same, reversing all shaping and the direction of the slant.

I love the effect of picking up stitches vs casting on stitches for the pocket lining. This technique creates an even edge with no visible stitches from sewing. Give it a whirl and I think you will be pleased with the results.

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