Weekly Fave! – The “Faux” Moto Jacket

A fashion staple, sometimes called the “Moto Jacket” is a short, tailored leather jacket. I’ve owned a black leather jacket for many years; now it has to be relined. I would never be without one, because a leather jacket ages beautifully, and is always in style, a true classic. I love this “Throttle Moto Jacket”…

My Favorite Way To Knit Front Borders – The Vertical Ribbed Band

We all find our favorite ways of finishing projects. For me, the following method of knitting front borders is one of the best ways to prevent flaring (the border looks too long for the edge). Flaring is often caused by picking up too many stitches along the front edge when using the common, horizontal technique…

Weekly Fave! – Unisex Cardigan

There just isn’t enough knitting patterns for men, but lately I find that Interweave includes some handsome looking knits in their magazine. This “Straightaway Cardigan” from Interweave Spring 2018 is definitely worthy of any man; knit in geometric squares of garter stitch and brioche. But my first thought when I saw this cardigan – I…

Weekly Fave! – Wrap Sweater

Knitscene for Spring 2018 is on the shelves. This interesting Provence Wrap Sweater is designed as a layering piece for yoga or lounging around. The sweater is knit using the German short row technique discussed in this issue. I’m only familiar with wrap-and-turn method for short rows, but for certain projects as the article reveals,…

Taking Measurements For Knit Hats

I came across this post on Churchmouse Yarns and Teas, and it’s definitely worth passing on to my readers. For the best fit, it’s important to take the proper measurements for all garments and accessories. Even though hats are easier to fit than sweaters, head measurements are often overlooked. Bonus:  How to take measurements for…

Weekly Fave! – Log Cabin Fingerless Mitts

These unique Log Cabin Mitts are a free pattern from Fringe Association. You can use your remnant stash, as all the mitts require are small amounts of three colors.  Carefully read the pattern before you start, as the mitts are worked in patches (not Intarsia), involving picking up stitches and clever joining. The result is…